Research Updates

The ASHT Research Division offers research updates to increase awareness of emerging research in the field of hand and upper extremity therapy. Each month, the Research Division releases a brief summary of an original published research paper selected by members of the Research Division.

2023 Research Updates

 

February Research Update

Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing 3-point Prefabricated Orthosis and Elastic Tape Versus Cast Immobilization for the Nonsurgical Management of Mallet Finger
Summary Provided by Lori Algar, OTD, OTR/L, CHT

Does the use of elastic tape and a 3-point prefabricated orthosis for non-surgical mallet finger have improved outcomes over other forms of immobilization that do not allow the orthosis to get wet?

A randomized clinical trial compared the outcomes of using a 3-point prefabricated orthosis (Oval 8) with elastic tape (Kinesiotape), which may get wet during immobilization versus casting for the management of nonsurgical mallet finger. A total of 70 participants were randomized to the treatment groups. Outcomes were assessed at 12 weeks and 6 months post initiation of immobilization for the mallet injury. There were no statistically or clinically significant differences between groups for extensor lag, DIP joint flexion deficit, function according to the Brief MHQ, and pain on the NPRS. The researchers suggest that both methods of immobilization are appropriate options for mallet injury immobilization each with clinical advantages (i.e. being able to get wet versus providing circumference pressure for edema).

Algar L, Backe H, Richer R, Andruskiwec S, Zalenski P, Lengyel A, Svogun C. Prospective randomized clinical trial comparing 3-point prefabricated orthosis and elastic tape versus cast immobilization for the nonsurgical management of mallet finger. J Hand Surg. 2022; epub ahead of print.

Journal Source: Journal of Hand Surgery

Access the Journal Article Here

Note: For non Journal of Hand Therapy articles: If you or your institution cannot access the complete article via the link, please contact Jenny M. Dorich, PhD, MBA, OTR/L, CHT, ASHT Research Division Director at jenny.dorich@cchmc.org.


January Research Update

Task-oriented exercises improve disability of working patients with surgically-treated proximal humeral fractures. A randomized controlled trial with one-year follow-up
Summary provided by Nancy Naughton, OTD, OTR/L, CHT

A randomized controlled trial n=70, studied individuals with a diagnosis of proximal humeral fracture and were s/p an open reduction and internal fixation. The participants’ mean age was 49 years. The participants were randomized into two groups.

The experimental group (n=35) included early motion beginning a 1-week post op which included a rehab program of task-oriented exercises tailored to their specific occupational demands and received O.T. along with physiotherapy.  The control group (n=35) included traditional physiotherapy initiated at 1-week post-op.  Both groups had 4 reassessments time points; Pre-surgery and pre- therapy, at the end of therapy and at 1 year follow up.

The primary outcome (DASH) had a clinically meaningful difference between groups. Although the primary or secondary outcomes did not achieve statistical significance and effect size was not assessed, the authors found that the experimental group achieved significantly larger improvements over time with respect to the control group.

The authors conclude that task-oriented exercises and occupational therapy (experimental group) was superior to general physiotherapy (control group) in improving disability, pain, and the quality of life of working patients with surgically treated PHFs.

Monticone, M., Portoghese, I., Cazzaniga, D. et al. Task-oriented exercises improve disability of working patients with surgically-treated proximal humeral fractures. A randomized controlled trial with one-year follow-up. BMC Musculoskelet Disorder 22, 293 (2021).

Journal Source: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

Access the Journal Article Here

Note: For non Journal of Hand Therapy articles: If you or your institution cannot access the complete article via the link, please contact Jenny M. Dorich, PhD, MBA, OTR/L, CHT, ASHT Research Division Director at jenny.dorich@cchmc.org.
 


2022 Research Updates

2021 Research Updates

2020 Research Updates

2019 Research Updates

2018 Research Updates

2017 Research Updates